Rotate and rename images according to their EXIF info

This is my short script to rotate and rename image files accoring to date captured based on their EXIF info.
You need jhead and exiv2 to run this. These two programs are also available in Windows and only require you to make small changes to work there as well.

#!/bin/bash -x
echo Rotating JPEG file(s)
jhead -ft -autorot D*.JPG

echo Rename(ing) file(s)
exiv2 -r '%Y%m%d-%H%M_:basename:' rename $(ls D*)

The files are then named like this (YYYYMMDD-HHDD_OriginalFileName.extension)

20120924-1320_DSC1234.JPG
20120924-1320_DSC1234.NEF
...

This script has been tested on Nikon D80 and D7000 image files.

Rename files by wildcard pattern and correct the EXIF timestamp metadata

This is a little script I’ve written to correct all my image files since the EXIF timestamp information is one hour out of sync. The filenames have been renamed to comply to the EXIF information and has to be renamed again because of the one hour scew. The filename can look something like this 20080102-1201_DSC_0910.JPG where the name is built up like YYYYMMDD-HHMM_Original_Filename.JPG
Remember to backup your imagefiles before you continue. You have been warned!

Rename files using wildcard pattern

This is the files we are going to rename

20080102-1201_DSC_0910.JPG
20080105-1923_DSC_1006.JPG
20080111-1220_DSC00189.JPG
20080122-0929_DSC00190.JPG

The mmv command is a command that lets you move/copy/append/link multiple files by wildcard patterns. It can be installed in Debian (or Debian based distributions like Ubuntu) by issuing the command

# aptitude install mmv

Now rename the files back to their original name

# mmv "*_DSC*" "DSC#2"

The result after this operation looks like this

DSC_0910.JPG
DSC_1006.JPG
DSC_1179.JPG
DSC_1302.JPG
DSC_1587.JPG

Correct the EXIF timestamp using exiv2

Next adjust the EXIF information stored in the image files to fix the one hour difference. This can be done using different EXIF tools like exiftool, but I will show you how it can be done using jhead and exiv2. The advantage with exiv2 is that it can also handle Nikon NEF files while jhead only can prosess JPG.

The current timestamp can be determined as follows

# exiftool DSC_0910.JPG | grep "File Mo"

The result in this case is

File Modification Date/Time : 2008:01:02 08:34:09

Adjust EXIF time info one hour forward using exiftool

# exiftool -AllDates+=1 DSC_0910.JPG

Other tools that could have done the job

Adjust EXIF time info one hour forward using jhead

# jhead -ta +1 DSC_0910.JPG

Install the jhead package using aptitude as mentioned earlier for the mmv package

Adjust EXIF time info one hour forward using exiv2

# exiv2 ad -a 1 DSC_0910.JPG

Rename files back to YYYYMMDD-HHMM_Original_Filename.JPG

It is now time to rename the files back to the YYYYMMDD-HHMM_Original_Filename.JPG format I used before this operation. This operation has been describe in a previous post named Rename image files according to EXIF date

exiv2 -r'%Y%m%d-%H%M_:basename:' rename $(ls D*)

The script

#!/bin/bash -x
# Needed software:
# exiftool
# exiv2
# mmv

# Script tested on Nikon D80 and Sony Cybershot DSC-W12 files

# Make a printout of how the files look like now
ls -l > repair_name_and_exif_before.txt

# Rename files to remove date formatting back to original name
mmv "*_DSC*" "DSC#2"

# Change EXIF info on JPG files (order is important)
exiftool -overwrite_original -AllDates+=1 D*.JPG
# Preserve date/time of original file when writing
exiftool -overwrite_original '-DateTimeOriginal>FileModifyDate' D*.JPG

# Change EXIF info on NEF files (order is important)
exiftool -overwrite_original -AllDates+=1 '-DateTimeOriginal>FileModifyDate' D*.NEF
# Preserve date/time of original file when writing
exiftool -overwrite_original '-DateTimeOriginal>FileModifyDate' D*.NEF

# Rename files back to date formatting (YYYYMMDD-HHMM_Filename) based on the new EXIF info
exiv2 -r'%Y%m%d-%H%M_:basename:' rename $(ls D*)

# Make a printout of how the files look like after conversion
ls -l > repair_name_and_exif_after.txt

Create a photo montage using imagemagick

This is a little bash script I put together to create a photo montage with 5 resized pitures in max 3 rows using imagemagick. The script is run from within the folder I have filled with the JPG images I want to create a montage from.

#!/bin/bashfor image in `ls *.JPG`  do    convert -resize 50x50! $image small-$image  donemontage small-*.JPG -mode Concatenate -tile 5x3 montage_final.jpg

The result file like the one below is saved with the filename montage_final.jpg.
Montage finalOne disadvantage using this technique is that it doesn’t keep the aspect ratio of the pictures.
You find more examples of montage usage by visiting the ImageMagick v6 Examples — Montage, Arrays of Images page.

Number of shots taken by Nikon D80 camera

The Nikon D80 camera contains a EXIF tag value that counts the number shots taken

Tag (hex) Tag (dec) IFD Key Type Tag description
0x00a7 167 Makernote Exif.Nikon3.ShutterCount Long Number of shots taken by camera

This can be extracted by running the following command

exiv2 -pt picturename.JPG
...
Exif.Nikon3.ShutterCount                     Long        1  5263

This example shows that there have been 5263 shots taken.

I guess this EXIF tag exists on Nikon D40x, D60 and D70 also, but this is not verified.

More Nikon specific EXIF tags can be found on http://www.exiv2.org/tags-nikon.html